glass manufacturers revived by rosé's clear view

glass manufacturers revived by rosé's clear view

What's wrong with this picture? The bottle on the left. A recent article on the Packaging Strategies website introduces Kuvée, "the world's first smart wine bottle," said to keep wine fresh for 30 days. (Consumers who pre-order a Kuvée Bottle are promised four "hand-selected wines"—a meaningless phrase that has been doing the rounds lately—for $179.)

This is just the latest in the parade of alternative wine-packaging options that have been introduced in recent years. It's a trend that threatens traditional bottle manufacturers, and rightfully so: Given the environmental impact of wine bottles, from the toxic pollutants emitted by glass plants to the energy consumed by shipping heavy glass worldwide, it's time we all take a hard look at how our wine is packaged.

So let's take a look at that label on the left. It's Bonny Doon's Vin Gris de Cigare.

If there is one wine that begs to be in glass—not for its own health, but for our aesthetic enjoyment—it's rosé. Bottle manufacturers are making the most of the current rosé craze by rolling out prototypes of Provence-style bottles. Clear, wide-bottomed and heavy, they're an extra expense for the winery, the consumer and the environment. But dang, do they look good.

sokol blosser's seasonal beer is here

sokol blosser's seasonal beer is here

two dope queens prefer rosé and billy joel to soft skin

two dope queens prefer rosé and billy joel to soft skin