a drinky rosé for today

a drinky rosé for today

I once heard a French winery proprietress describe a wine as "drinky."

I don't think she was struggling with her English.

She was trying to convey a quality that there is no proper descriptor for. A "drinky" wine is one you want to consume it in large quantities, as though it were water or juice. It's a wine you'd wash down a couple of Tylenol with. I don't mean that as an insult. Not at all.

Most wines, for me, are not "drinky." The very finest wines are certainly not "drinky." They are for tasting—sipping, not glugging. 

But a "drinky" wine can the very best among its peers of moderate price and high quality.

Consider the 2015 St. Reginald Parish "The Marigny" Pinot Noir Rosé ($18; 13.3% ABV; 2016 vintage out soon), named after the Faubourg Marigny in New Orleans. The grapes were mostly sourced from Sisu Vineyard in the Yamhill-Carlton subappellation of Oregon's Willamette Valley. 

The fruit was direct-pressed, meaning that the juice was destined for rosé alone. Vinification occurred spontaneously in neutral French oak. And the wine was sterile filtered, but was not fined.

That all adds up to a rosé that's clean and fresh and has sucrosité, which doesn't translate directly as "sweetness." Rather, there's a fresh-picked ripe-fruit quality to it. There's even a luscious-yet-subtle hint of maple syrup... yet still, this is a dry wine. 

I don't know what to ascribe this wine's "drinky" quality to. My hunch is that the wild yeast fermentation and neutral oak served to underscore the fresh, ripe flavor of the fruit. Can't wait to drink—not sip—the 2016. 

a little respekt

a little respekt

rosé des riceys

rosé des riceys