rosé des riceys

rosé des riceys

It being Valentine's Day, I suppose I ought to post something about a romantic wine. I am feeling anti-romantic at the moment, however, so I hesitate to recommend a personal favorite such as, oh, Pasqual Doquet Premiers Crus de la Côte des Blancs Rosé Champagne. 

Instead, I shall share with you the most blood-red and, I think, dolorous of the world's rosés. It, too, is from Champagne, so I suppose it qualifies as romantic by way of lineage and proximity. But Rosé des Riceys will only make your heart flutter, I think, if your idea of a good time involves Edgar Allan Poe readings and unenthusiastic bondage.

Les Riceys are a trio of tiny villages in the Côte des Bar, the far southern outpost of Champagne on the Burgundy border. These villages produce not only bubbly, but also red, white, and rosé (take that word with a grain of salt) still wines under the Coteaux Champenois AOP.

Rosé des Riceys looks like an inky-dark Pinot Noir, although there's a disturbing translucence to it (how can it be so like dark-ruby velvet, and yet so clear?). On the nose and palate, it acts a bit more rosé-like. There's a sugar-coated aroma, for example, thanks to partial carbonic maceration.

Jean-Jacques Lamoureux makes a particular favorite of mine that has smoky, sultry candied red rose petals on the nose, and sea salt, raspberries, green stems, and brambles on the palate. This admittedly strange wine isn’t welcoming in its youth but will reward cellar age. 

So there. Don't even bother drinking it tonight. Happy Valentine's Day.

Image courtesy of Internet Archive Book Images/flickr

a drinky rosé for today

a drinky rosé for today

the provençal rosé paradox

the provençal rosé paradox