rick ross the boss brings the rozay

rick ross the boss brings the rozay

Rick Ross has a rap sheet. Tattoos cover nearly every centimeter of his body. His thick neck bears the weight of ten to twenty1 massive, heavy gold chains. He goes by aliases: “The Boss”—or, as his adoring fans call him, “The Bawse”—and “Rozay.”

These nicknames are fitting, because this rapper just so happens to love . . . rosé.

Rozay has allied his personal brand with that of a pink sparkling wine from Provence, Luc Belaire. He composes rhymes about this fizzy drink. He makes music videos celebrating it.

Luc Belaire Rare Rosé is mysteriously cloaked in opaque black glass. Some special-edition bottles have light-up labels so you can spot them across the dance oor. The Boss’s homies, the “Black Bottle Boys,” periodically trot out in black varsity jackets emblazoned with the Luc Belaire motto.

Gentle readers, please try to imagine Tupac, Snoop Dogg, or Dr. Dre crooning about rosé back in the early nineties. Snoop liked to roll down the street sipping gin and juice. Tupac was a Hennessy man. And wasn’t it Dre who warned everyone, “Don’t Drink That Wine”?

But fifteen or so years later, tough-guy performers are striking a different chord with their lyrics. “Two in the morning I’m zoned in / Them rosé bottles foaming,” raps hip-hop artist Flo Rida. Wiz Khalifa calls for “rosé in my Champagne glass.” And then there is Rick Ross with his black bottle. Rozay’s rosé entered sixty-six international markets in its rst three years of existence, becoming the top-selling sparkling wine on Amazon.com. Between 2013 and 2014 alone, its sales grew by 340 percent, according to a Sovereign Brands spokesperson. Yes, that is correct. 

Luc Belaire Rare Rosé ($$$)
Rick Ross’s favorite sparkling pink comes from the same marketing minds who brought us Armand de Brignac, aka Ace of Spades, which Beyoncé apparently bathes in. Its provenance is cryptic (the website offers nothing but vague promotional speak), but Burgundy bubbly powerhouse Veuve Ambal, which produces a Provençal sparkling wine labeled Rivarose, appears to be behind the winemaking. As for the name, I’m willing to bet that the Hotel Bel-Air in Los Angeles served as inspiration. Luc Belaire Rare Rosé is made from a blend of grapes that’s mostly Syrah, but that’s not the point. The point is: This wine is sex-ay. The bottle is black. The color is perfect Provence peachy pink. The nose is red berries and warm pastry with a touch of boudoir. The mousse is luxuriant. And there’s just a hint of lemon-chiffon sweetness on the finish that brings to mind Moscato. Bottom line: It may not be original, but it’s anthemic. 

– Excerpt from Rosé All Day. Illustration by Mercedes Leon.

growing into its britches

growing into its britches

new year, new book

new year, new book